Elongated oval engagement ring

Oval styles are elegant, timeless and deeply romantic. These are just a few reasons why the oval cut engagement rings solitaire is one of the most sought after engagement ring styles on the market, competing only against the classic round cut.

Elongated oval engagement ring


Let's unravel the mysteries of the wonderful oval cut engagement rings solitaire and some reasons why to prefer them.



About oval cut diamond


Although oval facets are almost as old as the tradition of an engagement ring, what we know today as an oval cut diamond was an invention conceived by Lazare Kaplan in the early 1960s. Quite new for how popular it is. The oval cut is conceived as an evolution of the 1919 round cut.

It usually consists of 58 facets and a proportion of between 1.33 and 1.55. It is a cut that greatly optimizes carat weight giving a much larger outward appearance than other similar cuts of the same weight.

The highlight of this cut apart from its beauty is the bow-tie effect that is seen in all diamonds of this type. Two species of triangles that seem to meet in the center that create a sometimes dark or opaque effect and are created by the same facets of the diamond pavilion.



Why would you prefer an oval cut engagement ring?


The cut of this type of center diamond leaves an elongated visible side that makes it appear much larger than another diamond of the same weight.
Since they don't need a lot of weight to look interesting, the oval cut becomes much more accessible.

A small stone can get a pretty decent look, even with limited budgets. But this is also taken advantage of in larger stones which will be simply impossible not to look at.

These types of engagement rings are perfect for women with shorter fingers. The oval shape of the diamond helps to give a slimmer and longer appearance to the fingers.

 

Disadvantages


We love the oval cut, it is our insignia stone indeed, but it's important for couples to know all sides of the coin before they can say yes to an engagement ring like this. Since not everything could be so perfect, this type of stone has a few things worth considering.


First of all, there is the eternal debate of the bow-tie effect. Being a characteristic of the cut type (which it shares with others like the Pear, for example) a good jeweler knows that the bow-tie effect is not a bad thing. This is one of the many qualities that make the cut beautiful. Although in some ovals this effect can become a rather pronounced shadow.


Let's remember that each hand cut natural diamond is unique, even if it has the same facets and generally the same structure, no diamond is repeated. For this reason it is important to detail the stone well to rule out that the famous bow tie is not a shadow.


On the other hand, it is important to take diamonds of good clarity since the elongated cut could leave exposed points where the color or any imperfection could be visible. It is not common, but it happens. Especially in diamonds that have little setting.



The perfect oval cut engagement rings solitaire: How to find it?


Perfection is in the eye of the beholder. In the same way, the perfect oval engagement ring will also depend on what you are looking for. This is a model that allows you to play very well with color and size.


A beautiful platinum band is a great start, as you can save more on the stone per carat than a round cut, it is valid that you invest more in the metal.


You really don't need to go for a D diamond (they are the highest rate on the GIA color scale). Instead, a G will have the same impact and the difference is almost imperceptible. Except for the price, it will be noticeable.


Platinum Solitaire Ring with Oval Diamond



This classic Albert Hern band has these qualities and is ideal for a one-of-a-kind statement.

If you are looking for a custom oval cut, use the contact channel to set the diamond of your dreams.

 

If you have any questions or need some help you can write us, we will be happy to help you. 


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